S R Silcox - Author

Blog updated 2-3 times a month.

Year: 2013 (page 1 of 2)

The Story Behind the Story – How a 10 day deadline became my debut novella, Three Wishes

Three Wishes - Low res (2)

Monday the 9th of December saw me press publish on my first novella, Three Wishes. It’s up on amazon, and hopefully up on kobo soon. It was a rush to see it up on it’s own little page with my name on the cover.

This little book is so far from what I usually write, but I loved every minute of it. It’s conception was completely different to my other stories, so I decided to share the story behind the story.

For the better part of a year, I’ve been working on 2 series (both urban fantasies) and a couple of YA contemporary ideas, and getting stuck on all of them. I promised my wife that I’d have “something” published by the end of the year, and as the weeks and days ticked over, I realised I wasn’t going to be able to keep that promise.

I knew my wife would be upset, because from her point of view, my first year of being a full-time writer was a waste. I’ve written a lot of words and been able to find my ‘voice’, so I don’t think it was a complete waste of time, but I guess I can see why my wife would think that. I had nothing tangible to show for my efforts.

So, I said to myself, “Self, what would make your wife not be angry with you, and allow you to keep your promise?”

Self replied, “Write her a book. Women love that shit.”

So it was that I came up with the idea to completely forget about all that had come before for the time being, and come up with something entirely new. I gave myself 10 days to come up with a short story or novella that was of a publishable standard. It wouldn’t be enough to just have a story finished – I would have to be happy enough with it to want to share it with others ie publish it so the world could crap on it.

Apart from appeasing my wife, it would also serve as a way to prove to myself that I could come up with something from nothing, and that I could write fast if I wanted to. It would also double-up as a Christmas present, so how could I not go ahead with it?

Let me tell you, it was exciting and exhausting and fun and terrifying, all at once.

After tossing around ideas for a few hours, I came up with the one I used – a character so excited about Christmas and a believer in Santa who wanted to prove to others that Santa exists. That’s my wife to a T, although the character of Sophie isn’t really based on my wife (though she will probably tell you differently!)

I then gave myself another day to come up with the plot from start to finish. I had a minimum and maximum word count (7,500-12,000) to keep me from blathering on, and then came up with the characters and the general plot. I wrote one sentence about each chapter, flipped those chapters around so they worked better and then started writing.

The twist didn’t come to me until I was writing the chapter where it happens (I won’t spoil it for those who haven’t yet read the book). When that happened, I sat back and thought, “Huh, well there you go.” I didn’t second guess it, even though it changed my ending. I also didn’t second-guess it when another character appeared out of the blue and changed the course of Mac’s story.

All up, I hit the 10-day time-frame I gave myself to have it publish-ready. It took an extra few days to commission the cover art and get my beta readers and an editor friend of mine to look over it, and another day to teach myself how to format the file to upload it to amazon and kobo, which proved easier than I first thought.

Then came the time for the big reveal. I had tossed around just giving it to my wife on Christmas morning, but that meant that I couldn’t tell anyone about it, even if I published it, because my wife would find out. While it was an exciting prospect to wait and give her the best present ever, I really wanted my family and friends to know that all my talking about writing wasn’t me just talking crap.

I wanted validation, and I wanted to release my little book on the world and see if it could make its own friends.

I decided to print out the story and compile it into a little booklet, complete with a ribbon tying the pages in place.

Three Wishes - Original Print version (One of a kind!)

Three Wishes – Original Print version (One of a kind!)

I was extremely nervous giving the book to her, because I knew how much I wanted her to like it. The thing about my wife is, she can’t fake it. If she didn’t like it, she wouldn’t tell me she did, just to make me feel better. Having said that, we had the following conversation:

Wife: So is this just for me or for publishing?

Me: If you like it, I’ll publish it if you want me to. If you don’t I won’t.

Wife: That’s too much pressure! I’m going to lie to you. If I don’t like it, I’m going to tell you I do, just so you publish it anyway.

Lucky for us both, she liked it.

I sat beside her as she read it, and she seemed to laugh in all the right places. And because she liked it, I published it.

After all of that excitement, I’m not exactly sure how I can top that for a Christmas present, but I have just over a week to come up with something.

I’ll be quiet on the blog for the next few weeks because of the Christmas holidays and working on the 2 urban fantasy projects, and then we’re off with my niece on a 2 week holiday to Tasmania in January. I’ll still be writing during that time, but I probably won’t find time to update the blog until the end of January.

Until then, I’d like to wish you a Merry Christmas and a safe and prosperous New Year.

My debut novella, Three Wishes, is on special on amazon until Boxing Day for just 99c. You can buy it by clicking on the cover at the top of this post, or clicking here.

Second Ashes Test Wrap Up

Yesterday marked the end of the Adelaide test match, which was all but over for England on the second day when the Aussies declared with over 500 runs on the board.

It was great to see us finally get passed the early wobbles, and while Warner holed out again, he was on fire. I love watching him bat, and he’s the type of batsman that either gets out early or goes on to get a big score, and no matter which it is, he’s entertaining to watch.

On the bowling side, it was hard to pick a stand-out. Johnson again played havoc with the English heads, bowling fast and mean. Siddle, Harris and Lyon all played their parts, even though they didn’t all get the wickets they deserved. Watson and Smith also played cameos with the ball, and did well to tie the English down while our pacemen had a break.

It seems the English batsmen just can’t cope with the pace and bounce of our pitches. I’m not entirely sure why they’re not taking a leaf out of our play book and doing the same thing to us. I’m really looking forward to seeing how our quicks go on the Perth pitch, which is traditionally fast and full of bounce.

One thing that bothered me about the commentary during the match was a comment about Watson not contributing to the team. At current, he looks like a man who feels like every one else thinks he’s over stayed his welcome, particularly when he gets out. He’s had a lean series so far with the bat, with his highest score of 51 coming in the first innings in this test. He hasn’t been used with the ball much but he had figures of 1 for 0 (1 wicket for no runs) off 3 overs in the first innings, and 0 for 6 off 6 overs in the second. His economy alone when he’s bowling is a fantastic contribution. That’s exactly what you need from a part-time bowler, which he’s become over the last few years. And since when was 51 runs not a contribution in any innings?

Even though I was excited that we’re that much closer to bringing the Ashes home after the Adelaide win, I’m a little disappointed that we can’t seem to keep our mouths shut. I’m all for banter on the field, and I know I said in my last wrap-up that England give as good as they get (especially Broad, Anderson and Prior), but when we were looking like winning late on the fourth day, I really don’t know why Johnson and Haddin felt like they had to rub it in.

I saw Broad go after Johnson at the close of play on day 4, and I think that was uncalled for, but I think we really should be concentrating on winning matches instead of stirring up the opposition when we’re so far ahead of them both technically and mentally.

I’ve read on some of the news blogs that the reporting of the Stokes/Johnson clash has embarrassed both camps, and I really hope we can all go to Perth with clear heads and better manners. By all means, banter away, but the players have to remember that they’re not playing in a bubble, and the cameras are everywhere.

Having said all of that, bring on Perth. If England found it hard to play against our quicks on a batting pitch like Adelaide, I can’t wait to see how they go on a bowling pitch like Perth.

 

‘Tis the season…to go a little bit crazy

Today marks the official start of the Christmas Season, which for me means organising a visit home, booking our dogs into suitable digs for their “holiday”, and trying to find new hiding places for my wife’s Christmas presents.

It also means I’m a few weeks off my promise to have “something” published before the end of the year. Although I’ve had 12 months to get stuff finished, it’s taken me that long to get into a good routine, work through the ideas I have and to find my voice.

I’m still struggling with a few things but I’m getting better. I have some short stories I’m happy with so they’ll get published but more likely in the new year, and after I have some longer books out.

I have managed to get a lot of work done in the last week on a new project that’s been marinating for a few months. I have a very short time-frame, but I’m planning on this one being available for Christmas – a great time for publishing a debut work I think.

I’m also working on a project for a good friend of mine, which I’ll reveal when it’s ready to go (in the next week). It’s a very special and exciting project that’s been almost 2 years in the making, and it’s something that I’m proud to be a part of.

And that brings me to the ‘crazy’ – since the production schedule is so tight, I’ve been working late nights and early mornings just to get my own special project done. I have a few days left to get the first draft to my Beta’s, I’ve commissioned a cover that should be ready in the next week or so, and I’ve got all the back-of-house stuff ready to go – smashwords and amazon accounts, links, business stuff etc – so I’m hoping once the actual book is finished, it will be a smooth transition from unpublished writer to published author (famous last words, I know).

If  you want to hear about the progress of both of these projects, sign up for the newsletter. Subscribers get to hear about stuff first, and as a bonus, subscribers who sign up before the end of December get a free copy of my short story ‘The Breakup’.

Oh, I almost forgot the most important thing about today – it marks the day I get to open the first flap on my Advent calendar.

The Ashes – First Test Wrap-up

Balance has returned to my world, thanks to the Aussies’ thumping First Test win against England on the weekend.

After our dismal first innings batting performance, improved only by Brad Haddin’s and Mitch Johnson’s partnership, I thought ‘Here we go again’. And while we still have questions to answer in the top order, what really impressed me was the fact that our bowlers stood up to be counted. They worked as a team throughout the test match, and though Mitch Johnson failed to find his mojo early, he certainly had it in spades by our second innings in the field.

In all honesty, Mitch Johnson wouldn’t have been in my team. In the past, though he can be a firebrand (as he was in this match), he’s been too inconsistent. When you put him up against Siddle and Harris, who can both consistently hit a five-cent coin on pin-head, Johnson can be wayward and unpredictable. And though he started off in a familiar fashion – spraying balls wide and down leg-side and misusing bouncers – he didn’t take long to come into his own in this match.

His bowling style was suited to the Gabba pitch, and I’m glad we have some menace back in our bowling stocks.

Michael Clarke captained extremely well in this match. I particularly liked how he would chop and change bowlers whenever he thought it necessary instead of leaving any of them on for too long to try to play themselves in. He also played a fantastic knock in the second innings along side Dave Warner to break the hearts of the English bowlers.

What’s great to see is that a team previously (seemingly) acting like individuals is starting to play as one unit. Everyone’s bound to have a bad game at some stage, and in the past, that meant the rest of the team could crumble around them. Now, however, our batsmen stride to the crease with confidence, looking to score runs, and our bowlers work in tandem, harassing England’s batsmen with Clarke setting aggressive fields, looking for wickets.

I’m looking forward to seeing how the game progresses in Adelaide, as it’s historically been a wicket for batsmen. Our bowlers will have to be tighter in order to not let England get away too early, particularly if they bat first. I’ll also be interested to see if the selectors stick with the same team all round. Barring injuries, the only change I could see would be to rest Ryan Harris so we have him fit for Perth. As to who would replace him, I’d love to see James Pattinson back, but any one of Mitch Starc, Jackson Bird or Pat Cummings would be a fine replacement for Harris.

As for our batting, I don’t think there’s any need to make any changes. We need to allow the boys some confidence in their positions. We’ve seen how the axe hanging over his head affected Phil Hughes – before he was dropped the last time, he always seemed to play like a man in his last match. That’s not how you want players preparing mentally.

As for the latest sledging controversy, I think Clarke’s been hard done-by with his 20% match fee fine. I don’t condone what he said, but as with everything, it’s one line taken out of context of what appeared to be a very heated exchange. And don’t for a minute think Jimmy Anderson hadn’t given as much as he got.

The thing that disappoints me though is our media throwing these things out of proportion, and not backing our own team. England are in our back yard now, playing in our conditions. You don’t go to someone else’s house disrespecting their stuff and expect to get away with it. I have no doubt our boys would have copped a lot of lip from a chirpy and over-confident England team when they were on top in the previous series.

The should expect nothing less from us when they come to our house.

 

Well that didn’t go quite as planned

So a few weeks ago, I posted about unplugging from the technoverse and getting back to nature. I posted about getting stuck into writing without distraction and spending quality time with my wife.

Yeh. That’s totally not what happened. I never picked up my kindle, and my notebook and pens went untouched.

We spent so much time either hiking or relaxing/sleeping after hiking, there wasn’t much time for anything else.

It turns out that wasn’t such a bad thing though.

Firstly, I had my very own Biggest Loser Fears Week moment, when (scared of heights) I climbed a huge rock called The Pyramid. When we finally made it to the top, I was so over-whelmed I cried like a baby. It wasn’t pretty, but it was a release of all the emotion I stuffed down into my boots during the climb. My wife was suitably impressed and proud of my achievement, which made it all the more emotional for me. I never want to hold her back from doing anything, and since we love to achieve things together, me climbing to the top with her was a huge achievement – for both of us.

 

Scaling the Pyramid, Girraween SE Qld

Scaling the Pyramid, Girraween SE Qld

 

The fact that I sat for two hours waiting for her and a friend to attempt to scale the Second Pyramid was penance for my cursing all the way up the first Pyramid.

 

Waiting.....

Waiting…..

 

The coming down bit was just as hairy as the going up. At least going up, I could look ahead and not see the ground. Going down, I had no choice but to look where I was going.

 

A graceful descent

A graceful descent

The beer after that climb was well worth it when we got back to camp I can tell you.

If that climb wasn’t enough, I decided to do it all over again, climbing to the top of Bald Rock in NSW. We also stopped off at the border for a quick pic, and then went down to Tenterfield, where we found a bakery that had THE best meat pie I’ve had in a very long time. (No photo of that though – it was extremely messy, as all great pies are).

The border of Qld and NSW

The border of NSW (left) and QLD (right) – that’s me in the distance

Wifey (a park ranger) also had a hilarious confrontation with a killer possum. In the dead of night, we could hear the possum trying to get into various things in ours and our friends’ camp kitchens, and rustling through our bin. Wifey got up to chase it away, but it decided it was going to go down fighting. It took a run at her, she screamed, and I laughed. I stopped laughing when I realised wifey hadn’t closed the door of the tent. She closed it though, which saved an even more hilarious (and dangerous) scenario of having a rogue killer possum rampaging through our tent.

What was even more hilarious is that every night after that, that same possum would come down into the camp, strut around and eye wifey off, trying to entice her into another confrontation. Wifey didn’t take the bait though, and they ended up mutually respecting each others’ boundaries.

So, even though the trip didn’t turn out like I had planned, it turned out pretty great. The weather was fantastic, we saw some fantastic sites, and I got to spend some quality time with wifey and our friends.

Would I do it all again?

We’ll see…

Unplugging

My wife gets extremely frustrated with me over my use of technology. I love sharing stuff with my friends on facebook, and on text. To the point where when something happens at home, my wife says (sarcastically) “Are you going to share THAT on facebook?”

She has a point I suppose. I love connecting through facebook and twitter and text with my friends and family that I don’t have face-to-face contact with. And let’s face it, living out in western Queensland, five hours from the closest major city has it’s drawbacks. Not least of which is contact with like-minded people, and the friends we left when we moved.

So anyway, this week sees us both unplugging from all things tech because we’re going camping for a few days. I do have one exception though – I’m loading up my kindle with stuff to read, because I’ll have a lot more hours in the day to do absolutely nothing.

Apart from that though, we’ll have no phone reception, and no power to recharge devices I’d normally use, including my eee pc and laptop.

My wife thinks I’ll struggle, but I don’t think so. I’m taking lots of pens and notebooks, and have big plans for getting some writing done. I’m going to use the time to look at some ideas that have been floating around my head drive for a long time and see if I can flesh them out enough to add them to my schedule for next year.

I also have a series idea that I’ve had rolling around for a year or so that I’m very excited about, but need to really get the basics brainstormed and set down. I have huge plans for that idea if I can make it work, but I don’t want to go at it half-arsed like I have with my ideas previously.

I’m also looking forward to writing long-hand, which is how I started around 15 years ago, even though I had a pc I could use. When I wrote long-hand, I wrote without one side of my brain thinking of the editing process, and it felt freeing. When I type on a laptop which is what I do now, I can immediately delete what I’ve written, and that’s sad I think. When I write long-hand, there’s no deleting it into the ether. I also like the second-draft process that comes from typing out hand-written notes or chapters.

Apart from all of that though, I’m looking forward to spending some quality time with my wife and friends, and just relaxing. The home-brew beer and ginger beer will have a good showing over the next week, and I’m sure they will help grease the wheels.

Besides, I’ll have a whole weeks’ worth of photos and stories to regale my facebook friends with when I get back.

 

 

 

 

 

Oooh, shiny…

Welcome to my new little place on the internet. I’d been toying with the idea of having my own domain and website for awhile, but decided to set up a free blogger account to learn what works and what doesn’t. What tipped me over the edge was blogger cracking the shits and doing something really weird, like losing my header (even though in the previews it exists) and sending out a post that was 12 months old as if I’d just posted it.

While having that free blog was a great learning experience, the one thing I discovered was that I am crap at sticking to topics, and just as bad at getting content out regularly.

So with that in mind, this shiny new website will be primarily a landing spot for readers and anyone else who’s interested to check out who I am and what I do. My intention is to update it intermittently, especially since I really need to stop procrastinating and start getting some work out for you guys to actually buy.

If you’ve ever checked out my old blog (here), you’ll notice a few little things that will be different on this one.

Firstly, I’ve set up a mailing list, which you can sign up for using the form on the right, and I’ll use that to let subscribers know about stuff before I announce it on here. There’ll also be subscriber-only competitions and opportunities to get books before they’re released. The intention is to email quarterly at the least, monthly at the most, but really only when there’s news to share, or I’m excited about something I’ve discovered or written that I think subscribers will like.

Secondly, I’m playing around with podcasting at the moment as a substitute for written posts, and will make a decision in 2014 on whether to pursue that or not. I’m really excited about it, because I love talking, and I quite often find myself talking into the blank stares of family and friends, so talking to a screen shouldn’t be any different.

Lastly, the look of the site will change over the next few months until I find a theme and widgets etc that I’m happy with.

If you have any thoughts on what you’d like to see on the site, or any questions you’d like me to talk about in a post, please don’t hesitate to comment on here, or send me an email to selena at srsilcox dot com

(As an aside, does writing your email like that even work for stopping spammers from getting hold of it or have their programs gotten smarter?)

So, again, welcome to the new site, and please stop by every now and then to catch up, or join the list.

 

What I really think of… Hugh Howey

Hugh Howey’s Wool

‘The children were playing while Holston climbed to his death; he could hear them squealing as only happy children do. While they thundered about frantically above, Holston took his time, each step methodical and ponderous, as he wound his way around the spiral staircase, old boots ringing out on metal treads.’

So begins Hugh Howey’s first novella in his blockbuster Silo series, Wool.

I can’t exactly remember when I first heard about this guy, Hugh Howey, but I do remember his name popping up all over twitter and blogs, and I thought “Hell, I’ll give this guy a go.” At 99c for his first novella, Wool, it was a pretty good bargain, and having received my first kindle for Christmas 2011, I was looking for cheap books to fill it. 

I read that first book in one sitting then immediately downloaded the second part (“Proper Gauge”) and then the third one (“Casting Off”). I remember staying up until the early hours of the morning to finish “Casting Off”, and making myself wait until the next morning to download the final two in the series “The Unraveling” and “The Stranded”. 

Briefly, the Silo series is set in an apocalyptic world, where humans live underground in huge silos 144 stories below the ground. It’s set in a time when no-one can remember what happened on the outside, and no-one questions why they live the way they do. 

That is, until Jules comes along. Jules is a mechanic from the Down Deep, the very bottom levels of the silo, where she works to keep the machinery of the silo functioning. Needing a new sheriff after the tragedy that is Holston’s death (which is so hauntingly written in Wool 1), Jules is the one who steps up (albeit reluctantly). Her curiosity gets the better of her, and she begins to question everything she has ever been told about the history of the silo and the circumstances of their existence. Wool 2-5 follows Jules’ story – the consequences of questioning long-held beliefs, and the lengths that some will go to to protect the status quo.

The reason I love these books so much is that they focus on something that is a real problem in our own time – taking what we see for granted, and living our lives through computer screens. We listen to politicians and the media and assume that what they tell us is the truth. We have no real desire to do the hard work and find information for ourselves. We form opinions on someone else’s view of the world, instead of seeing it for ourselves.

I know from reading interviews of Hugh that those were major factors in his desire to write this series. 

I came away from that first series feeling like I needed to be more involved in the world around me; to take a more proactive role in my own life, instead of sitting back and letting it happen. 

For any of my teacher friends out there, if you’re looking for books to spark discussions with students, these are the books to read. 

On a slightly different tangent, Hugh is also a shining light for those of us looking to self-publish our own stories. Hugh began with a small publisher with his first Molly Fyde book (Molly Fyde and the Parsona Rescue), a YA science fiction novel, and quickly learned that he could do a lot of the publishing side of things himself. 

So he did.

The popularity of his Silo series made bigger publishers and agents sit up and take notice, and he made history when he signed a print only deal with Simon and Schuster, enabling him to keep his digital (ebook) rights.

This is extremely significant, because traditionally, contracts from publishers effectively restrict authors from writing and publishing anything that is seen to be in competition to the books they’ve sold, which really means everything that comes after.

I won’t bore you with the ins and outs of how that deal will hopefully help to change the publishing industry in the long term, and how they treat their authors, but suffice it to say, it’s a small step in the right direction.

There is so much more I can say about Hugh Howey and the effect he’s had on the self- and indie-publishing industries and authors, but I will leave the other stuff for another post.

The last thing I will say is BUY HIS BOOKS! I guarantee you won’t be disappointed.

You can find Hugh here:

Hugh Howey

Buy his books from Amazon (or order the paper copies of his books from your local bookstore):

Hugh’s Amazon Author Page

You can find out more about his Wool series at Simon and Schuster here:

Wool Series

Let’s get Sonny to meet P!nk!!

I want to tell you about a great friend of mine (and some time great rival), Sonny Hughes. 
Sonny and I played for rival soccer teams, and were sworn mortal enemies for the best part of 10 years. She was a young and cocky striker, and I was a young and smart-mouthed goalkeeper. It was a rivalry made in heaven. There was no greater satisfaction for me than denying her a goal, and some of my greatest and fondest memories in the sport are of our matches against each other (not to mention the “friendly” banter).
To me, Sonny was always energetic and full of life. She was tough and strong and unforgiving on the field. Little did I know that those characteristics would come in handy when she faced the fight of her life.
At the age of just 33, she has fought and beaten cancer 3 times – in 2008 it was Non-Hodgkins lymphoma; in 2009 there was cancer in her groin; and finally, after 2 years cancer free, in February 2012 she was diagnosed with cervical cancer. Her last bout of chemo and radiation caused complications that have resulted in her having an ileostomy and colostomy. In the space of just a few months, I saw her go from someone who was getting her life back on track and regaining her health, to fighting for her life.
She wasn’t even sure she’d live long enough to see a P!nk concert, such was her prognosis, but she bought a ticket anyway. She has fought her battle against cancer with dignity and humility, and has come out the other side with her humour and strength intact. Nothing would make her fight worthwhile like getting to meet P!nk in person. 
What can you do to help?
Like and share the facebook page with family, friends, businesses and anyone else you can think of to get the word out. Flick Sonny a message on the page to let her know you’re thinking of her. Let P!nk know on twitter and facebook that this wonderful, courageous woman has a dream that she can make come true – a dream that only a few short months ago really was impossible.

Introducing… Layce Gardner

I’m not big on the lesbian romance genre. (I can’t believe I can say that with a straight face, considering I am currently dabbling in that genre, but anyway.)

I guess it’s because my early forays into it were a little sub-par. The characters were all a little too beat up, and some of the plot points bordered too far on the unbelievable side of the fence for me.

I get it. We’ve all been through our Coming Out period, our Lusting After our Straight Best Friend period and our U-Haul Lesbian period (in Australia we call it the Budget Lesbian period) among others. Most of us want to read about that stuff to make us feel better about bad decisions, bad romances, and to escape from our bad, sad lives.

Here’s the thing. I’m more than the sum of my bad and sad parts. I have lots of happy times. “Why doesn’t anyone write about the happy times?” I lamented. “Why doesn’t anyone write something fun?”

Then I found Layce Gardner. I am proud to be able to call her my Facebook Friend. (Which means that she stupidly accepted my friend request even though she didn’t know me from a bar of soap, and now I can stalk her interact with her whenever I want.)

I can’t remember exactly how I discovered her novel Tats, but I devoured it in two sittings. I would have devoured it in one, but a pesky little thing called my day job came between us.

I passed my paperback copy on to a great friend of mine, along with rave reviews. (Lisa, I still want it back!)
 
I loved the book so much, in fact, that as soon as the next book Tats Too came out, I downloaded it onto my kindle as soon as it was available. This time, I got to read it while I was on holiday in Fiji – I wasn’t going to let a little thing like a friend’s wedding get in the way of me and that book.

I read parts of it out to my wife, giggling like an idiot, while my wife just looked at me knowing full well I AM an idiot. “I guess you have to read what happened before” was my answer to her blank looks. 

Anyway, to the point. 

I downloaded and read Penny Nickels and Wild at Heart as soon as they came out too, and was itching for more.

That was a few months ago now, and I had decided that I wasn’t going to go out of my way to buy any new books until I had finished some of my own. 

Then, I saw this pop up on my facebook feed:

I was so excited that the new book was available, but you know, my no-book-buying thing.

I held off for exactly three days. 

I bought it, promising that I would only read the first chapter after I had at least completed my word-count quota for the day. 

I only lasted a couple of hours before I thought “I’ll just read the first paragraph and see if it grabs me.” 


A couple of hours of reading and laughing out loud later, I realised that it was past midnight, and that I had wanted to get to bed early, so I could get up early and get in some pre-caffeinated writing time. (For non-writers, that’s the best time to trick my muse into giving up some of her secrets – before she wakes up and goes MIA).

I don’t really have the whole “do something good, reward yourself” thing down very well.

So the truth of it is, I don’t think I can hold out on reading the rest of the book. I think I might just take an early weekend and go ahead and get it over and done with.
If you’re curious, my favourite part of the book so far is when the girls (Dana and Trudy) are sharing an unlit cigarette. They both take pretend puffs and then Trudy takes the cigarette back and “ashes” on the floor.

No wait. It’s when Dana meets Ellen. “She had brown-almost-black eyes like melted chocolate and a smile that reminded Dana of strawberry cheesecake. Her smile itself didn’t exactly remind Dana of cheesecake; it’s that the smile gave her the same feeling as looking at a slice of strawberry cheesecake.”

No, it’s the conversation about Dana’s need to fill a hole in a conversation. “See, when there’s a hole in the conversation I feel this urge to stick something in the hole. In fact, there’s very few people in this world I’m comfortable being around and not sticking something in their hole.”

Layce, you had me at “‘My girlfriend is a slut,’ Dana Dooley said.” It’s going to be another late night.

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